June ACLU Fundraiser: Her Decade

Here is June’s fundraiser short story for the ACLU:

ALL PROCEEDS FROM THIS STORY GO TO THE AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION!

A young man celebrates his eighteenth birthday with some drinking. Who could get hurt?

Susan Ann Marchetti, that’s who. Killed in a drinking and driving accident. And now the young man who killed her will grow to adulthood visiting her each year, as the anniversary of his birth becomes the anniversary of her death. Ten birthdays at a grave could harden anyone; who will he be at the end of this decade?

Set in the same world as Bang, Boy Toy, and other Lyga novels, “Her Decade” forms a crucial backdrop to those stories, opening up new details as it reveals a powerful history for the town of Brookdale.

As with all of the fundraiser stories, “Her Decade” sells for $1.99 and will only be available for one month. Please buy the story and spread the word!

May ACLU Fundraiser: “Pulse vs. the Killing Fiend”

Pulse vs. the Killing Fiend coverAfter last month’s extremely dark turn, I thought maybe something a little lighter for this month… So, let’s read about a super-powered serial killer!

A hero. A villain. And a cop caught in between.

“Sometimes it feels more like they’re all involved in some kind of celestial chess match and we’re less than pawns. We’re the board. And no one cares what happens to the board.” — Capt. J. Fannon (Chicago Police Dept.)

Blending his serial killer bona fides and his love of super-hero comics, Barry Lyga presents a tale from the point of view of a Chicago cop trying to hunt a super-powered murderer. But which is more vexing: discovering the identity of the killer or uncovering the secrets behind the super-hero who’s helping out on the case?

As always, the story is $1.99 and all proceeds benefit the American Civil Liberties Union.

Please buy the story and spread the word! Thanks!

March Fundraiser: “The Ideas of March”

This month’s fundraiser is shorter than the others, but I think what it lacks in length, it makes up for in punch. At the risk of sounding incredibly full of myself, I really, really love this story!

The Ideas of March coverA girl receives the most disturbing Valentines present ever. While everyone is talking about that, a famous actress adopts her latest child overseas, to the camera flashes of the paparazzi. And while sanctions in the Middle East cause chaos and controversy, ten teenagers are dumped from their sailboats into frigid water…even as another group of teens plans to rocket a giant mirror into space to protect us from global warming.

What connects these stories? How are they related?

Maybe they’re not.

But maybe, just maybe, they are.

As with all of this year’s fundraisers, “The Ideas of March” costs a mere $1.99 and all proceeds go to the ACLU.

Also, the story will only be available for the month of March, so go get it now! And please, spread the word to your friends!

February Fundraiser: “Loving the University”

As I said back here, I will be publishing a short story each month as a fundraiser for the ACLU. When I first came up with this idea, I picked the ACLU because I like that organization and because, well, let’s let President Andrew Shepard tell us:

 

So, yeah. Since those halcyon days of, uh, less than a month ago, the ACLU has proven itself to be every bit as necessary as I feared…and as effective as I’d hoped.

“Loving the University” costs only $1.99, and as with all of the monthly fundraisers, every penny I make will go straight to the ACLU. Please, buy the story and tell your friends to buy it, too!

Loving the University cover imageStavros has worked his whole life at the Pizza Emporium.

(Or has he?)

He’s watched generations of University men come and go, ever-changing, while his life has remained the same.

(Or has it?)

“Loving the University” is an intimate and intricate look into one man’s choices and the pains of mere living.

(Or is it?)

Buy here:

One Way I Choose to Fight

So, last year a thing happened. A thing I was — and am — not happy about. If you’re reading this, I imagine you feel the same because the people who read my books generally seem to be cool like that.

What can I do about this? has been a pretty common refrain since the election. And the good news is that there’s a lot we can do, both collectively and individually. I’ve been donating money to worthy organizations and keeping on top of my elected officials, for example.

But I’ve wanted to do more. I’m not a politician or much of an organizer, but I’m a writer. So I figured out a way to make writing be my way of “doing more.”

For every month in 2017, I will publish a different short story. Some of these stories will be short. Some will be long. Some will be old. Some will be new.

They will all cost $1.99.

And every cent I make will go to the American Civil Liberties Union.

The stories will only be available for one month each. If you miss the January story, well, it’s gone. I’m hoping this imposition of a form of scarcity will motivate people to buy.

Let me be clear about this: I’m not keeping your money. I’m not taking a single penny for myself. You’re handing money to me so that I can give it to the ACLU. (If you want to just give money straight to them or donate directly to them as well, don’t let me stop you!)

Do I expect this to make a difference? Beats the hell out of me. Look, if this crazy thing of mine spreads and gets lots of attention, it could end up being a significant chunk of change. If not, well, I guess every penny helps, right?

Please tell everyone. Please tweet it and Tumblr it and Facebook it and Snapchat it and Instagram it and do whatever else. Heck, you can even tell people about it face-to-face. (I know — crazy, right?)

The first story is already up. It is titled “The Ghosts at 95,” and you can see the cover and description below. It will come down late on January 31/early on February 1, depending on where you live. The clock’s ticking. Go buy it.

Ghosts at 95 cover

ALL PROCEEDS FROM THIS STORY BENEFIT THE AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION!

The year is 2006, and Jeremy Castle has it pretty good. His girlfriend has left him, true, but he has a job at a top downtown financial firm that has made him pretty rich. From his new apartment, he can see the Statue of Liberty and the construction at Ground Zero. If only he could figure out the meaning of the lights that only he can see. And those voices… Why does he keep hearing those voices…?

In “The Ghosts at 95,” Barry Lyga tackles the themes that made his reputation: Isolation, being an outcast, and the fear that your best self and your worst self may be one and the same.