Memory Monday – Flash Reads His Death

For a long time, the Flash comic was famous for covers/stories like this, very meta sort of stuff. It was a big influence on a lot of today’s comic book creators, and it definitely lodged in my brain as a kid. And warped me appropriately.

Imagine you’re looking at this on a newsstand. How could you not buy it?

Flash reads

I think what I like most is the challenge to the reader to face “the terrible secret of this book.”

(From Flash #277, June 1974. Cover by Nick Cardy.)

I HUNT KILLERS Goes to Korea!

Yes, it’s beginning to feel very strange to keep making announcements about a book pretty much no one has read yet. And yet, here I am again.

It’s as simple as the headline says: Courtesy of the fine folks at Random House Korea, the I HUNT KILLERS series will be published in Korea. I’m pretty psyched, for all the obvious reasons, and also for one personal milestone: This is my first sale in Asia!

Thanks to everyone at Little, Brown, Anderson Literary, and — of course — Random House Korea for making this happen!

I HUNT KILLERS Goes to Korea!

Yes, it’s beginning to feel very strange to keep making announcements about a book pretty much no one has read yet. And yet, here I am again.

It’s as simple as the headline says: Courtesy of the fine folks at Random House Korea, the I HUNT KILLERS series will be published in Korea. I’m pretty psyched, for all the obvious reasons, and also for one personal milestone: This is my first sale in Asia!

Thanks to everyone at Little, Brown, Anderson Literary, and — of course — Random House Korea for making this happen!

This Week in Rejection!: Boulevard

Funny thing about this one: I remember reading and really enjoying at least a couple of issues of Boulevard. I really, really wanted them to publish a story of mine, and I remember being absolutely crushed by this rejection (which is a little worse for wear over the years…):

But read that bit added on to the form letter:

“A very moving, nicely written story. It is publishable, but not what we are looking for.”

Wow. Seeing that now, through 2011-eyes, I am thrilled with this letter. I understand that Younger Barry was crushed, but he shouldn’t have been. This rejection is all good news — the story has emotional impact and is well-written. It’s just aimed at the wrong market. That’s tremendous news!

Funny how time can change the impact of something. The next time you receive this sort of rejection, let it sit for a few days and then give it a read with fresh eyes. It may be better news than you think!

Memory Monday – Lex Luthor Explains it All

I already ran this Memory Monday panel once before, but then I accidentally overwrote it. And so, once again, I present this panel, in which Lex Luthor explains the DC Multiverse.

One panel.

One friggin’ panel.

In 1985, DC wiped out its Multiverse in an effort to “simplify” its continuity. This kicked off literally decades of reboots, deboots, and re-reboots, up to and including the recent “New 52” initiative. And why did DC make this choice in 1985? Well, because they claimed that the concept of the Multiverse was “too complicated” for readers. Never mind that the multiple universes had existed in stories for decades at that point. Or that the idea had appeared on such complicated, complex fare as the Super Friends and G.I. Joe cartoons, apparently without befuddling those shows’ audiences. Oh, no — DC was convinced that no one could get it.

Even though the concept was, in reality, so simple that it could be explained in ONE PANEL.

 

Luthor and the Multiverse

 

 

Comics. Sometimes, they break your heart.

(From DC Comics Presents Annual #1, 1982. Written by Marv Wolfman. Art by Rich Buckler and Dave Hunt.)