This Book Makes You Look Great!

 

Does This Book Make Me Look Fat?

 

Ever since my first book came out, people have been asking me when I would write some comic books. Probably not going to happen, but if you were curious about what a Barry Lyga comic book might be like, you can check out the Does This Book Make Me Look Fat?, now in stores.

It’s a cool anthology of stories and essays about body image, with some great writers like Daniel Pinkwater, Sara Zarr, Coe Booth, Margo Rabb, and Matt de la Peña. It also contains a short comic book story — “The Mating Habits of Whales” — written by me, with art by my friend Jeff Dillon (who also did the artwork for Schemata that ended up being cut from The Astonishing Adventures of Fanboy and Goth Girl).

As always, you can find Does This Book Make Me Look Fat? at AmazonBN.com, and your local independent book store.

More Fun with Amazon’s SIPs

Per this entry here, Amazon’s algorithms sometimes offer up odd SIPS (Statistically Improbable Phrases).

In the case of Boy Toy, check out the two circled items:

Boy Toy SIP

Again, I am forced to ask: Really, Amazon? “Session transcript” and “slugging average” are statistically improbably phrases? Come on.

(Lest anyone think I’m annoyed by these, rest assured I’m not. I find them amusing, is all. It’s what happens when you let a computer think. A human being wouldn’t blink twice at those phrases. A computer isn’t so sure about them.)

Really, Amazon?

Found this sort of amusing…

Amazon.com’s product pages have all kinds of useful information these days, along with a quirky little datum called “statistically improbably phrases,” or SIPs for those of you who like your acronyms to imply a beverage that’s just a little bit too hot. An SIP is a phrase that, in Amazon’s opinion, is unlikely to appear in regular usage. It’s one way of giving readers a window into a book’s content, I guess.

Well, check out what I’ve circled in red from this Amazon screen capture on the Fanboy page:

Amazon screen cap

Really, Amazon? “Comic book convention” is a statistically improbable phrase? Really? I’ll call the folks in San Diego… 🙂